National Immunization Awareness Month

Published: August 9, 2021

Team: defined as coming together to achieve a common goal. Most Americans in 2021 have a common goal: to eradicate COVID-19. Today, we have a shot at that, but the best way to keep us COVID-free, is to vaccinate against the virus.  

August is National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM), a yearly observance to highlight the importance of vaccination for people of all ages. Read the CDC’s NIAM web page about the COVID-19 vaccine and other vital vaccines. While there, test your knowledge by taking this vaccine quiz.

To learn about our immunization history, simply look to our recent past. In the 1940s-50s, polio disabled an average of more than 35,000 people in the U.S. each year. And, just as we did this past year, public health officials had to impose quarantines (to separate and restrict the movement of well people who may be exposed to the contagious disease). But thanks to the polio vaccines (and parents who vaccinated their children on schedule), polio has been nearly eliminated in this country. Learn more about it at CDC website.

As we await more research on the COVID-19 vaccine for children 12-years-old and younger, the rest of us can get the COVID-19 vaccine. Think of it as taking one for the team. Let’s continue moving forward toward that goal - and protect your team around you, such as neighbors, families and friends – by getting vaccinated and encouraging others to do so as well. 

Visit our preventive health page for a schedule of all immunizations by age, and the COVID-19 web page for more on where to get the vaccine.

Mark your calendar: It is almost time to get your flu shot (widely available in October). Get yours at a doctor’s office or at the pharmacy. Check WHA’s flu shot finder for our medical group contacts to check on schedule and upcoming flu shot clinics; and for anyone nine years of age and older, check for participating pharmacies, to get one with a zero copay.  

For the latest Coronavirus (COVID-19) information, click here: getting care, testing and vaccines